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12 Etowah High seniors honored by National Merit Scholarship program

12 Etowah High seniors honored by National Merit Scholarship program

WOODSTOCK, Ga. -- Etowah High School is proud to announce that a dozen of its seniors have been honored by the 2012 National Merit Scholarship program.

Two Etowah students were chosen as semifinalists for the prestigious scholarship. Matthew R. Bird and Philip T. Litrel will now compete to become finalists in a program that awards $34 million to the nation's best and brightest every year.

Ten additional students were named Commended Students by the program:

* Casey L. Anthony
* Tyler Bryant
* Dryn H. DuBois
* Joseph M. Gerth
* Matthew Glazier
* Kyle M. Jenkins
* Clay T. McElwain
* Zachary A. Munson
* Austin A. Salyers
* Jacob D. Young

Although these seniors will not continue in the scholarship competition, they are still among the top five percent of the country's high school students who took the PSAT last year.

7 named to Deal's immigration review board

7 named to Deal's immigration review board

ATLANTA -- Seven people have been appointed to a newly created board to look into complaints about state and local officials failing to comply with state laws related to immigration.

The Immigration Enforcement Review Board was created by the state's tough new law targeting illegal immigration.

Appointed by Gov. Nathan Deal are Americans for Immigration Control spokesman Phil Kent, former Fulton County GOP chairman Shawn Hanley and lawyer Ben Vinson. Appointed by Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle are Dallas Mayor Boyd Austin and Coweta County Sheriff Mike Yeager. Appointed by House Speaker David Ralston are lawyer Robert Mumford and Colquitt County Commissioner Terry Clark.

The board will have the power to investigate complaints, hold hearings, subpoena documents and witnesses, and take disciplinary action.

CTC president to lead new tech college initiative

CTC president to lead new tech college initiative

MARIETTA, Ga. -- Dr. Sanford Chandler, president of Chattahoochee Technical College, has been chosen to lead the Technical College System of Georgia's (TCSG) new International Center for Technical Education, the TCSG announced Thursday.

The center's goal is to build greater worldwide recognition of the TCSG education programs while also working to expand new and existing international student and faculty exchange at the 25 TCSG schools.

"I'm looking forward to this new challenge and continuing to make a difference in the lives of students here and abroad," Chandler said. "It's my hope that this international initiative will ultimately help to improve the economic and workforce development of our state."

International enrollment at Chattahoochee Tech grew under Chandler's leadership.

Are you ready for some (high school) football?

Are you ready for some (high school) football?

CHEROKEE CO., Ga.

Etowah High educator wins teaching award

Etowah High educator wins teaching award

WOODSTOCK, Ga. -- A teacher at Etowah High School in Woodstock was one of only 18 educators statewide to be honored for her hard work by the Georgia Association for Career & Technical Education (GACTE) this year.

Pamela McArthur Teems, who teaches family and consumer sciences, was nominated for the award by her colleagues.

Teems, a Cherokee County native, has more than 25 years of teaching experience. She holds degrees from Berry College and the University of Georgia.

Each recipient of the award received a plaque naming him or her a 2011 Teacher of the Year. They were honored during the GACTE annual conference in July.

People urged not to shop, work to protest Ga. law

People urged not to shop, work to protest Ga. law

ATLANTA (AP) -- As many parts of Georgia's law cracking down on illegal immigration take effect, a Latino community group is organizing "a day without immigrants" to protest the measure.

The Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights is calling for a day of non-compliance, asking businesses to close and community members to stay home and not work or shop Friday.

Alan Conner, owner of Dakota Blue restaurant in Grant Park, said he thinks the law is unjust and planned to close for lunch Friday in solidarity.

But some urge caution. Jerry Gonzalez, executive director of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials, says skipping work without authorization could cost people jobs in a tough economic climate.

Groups are also organizing a "march for justice" on Saturday at the state Capitol to protest the law.

(The Associated Press)

LOCAL PROFILE: R&B Scene in Atlanta

LOCAL PROFILE: R&B Scene in Atlanta

ATLANTA – Derived from popular genres of music like jazz, blues and gospel, rhythm and blues was born. Rhythm and Blues music, which is widely referred to as R&B, is unique in that it has the ability to take on many musical identities, at once. Some say the genre was first identified in Harlem, during the Harlem Renaissance, which is known as one of the most prominent cultural movements for African Americans during the 1930’s. However, others think the genre originated in the 1940’s when African Americans began moving to northern cities, creating cultural fusion.  

The music evolved from “race music”, which was an offensive term that referred to the music of African Americans, into jump blues which was known for having a swing boogie, big band sound.